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04/11/2016 New “Commit to Complete” campaign focused on timely degree completion
New “Commit to Complete” campaign focused on timely degree completion

University of Nebraska President Hank Bounds announced today a new initiative aimed at ensuring students have the tools they need to complete their degree on time so they can enter the workforce sooner and with as little debt as possible.

The “Commit to Complete” campaign provides students, parents and advisors with a four-step plan focused on timely degree completion. The university is providing campaign information to admissions offices and new student enrollment advisors across the campuses, as well students, educators, community leaders and other stakeholders across the state. Details and downloadable materials, including a video, flyer and posters, are available at www.CommitToComplete.com.

"Nebraskans rightfully want to see us focused on helping our students earn their degree as quickly as possible so they can minimize the costs of their education and start their careers sooner."

“One of the most common questions I hear as I travel across the state and talk with Nebraskans – whether students or parents, policymakers or business leaders – is, ‘What is the University of Nebraska doing to make sure students are crossing the finish line successfully?’” Bounds said. “Nebraskans rightfully want to see us focused on helping our students earn their degree as quickly as possible so they can minimize the costs of their education and start their careers sooner. Commit to Complete is one more strategy we’re putting in place to improve student success at the University of Nebraska.”

Bounds noted that in just a few short years, more than 70 percent of all jobs in Nebraska will require higher education. For the university to continue to fulfill its responsibility to meet Nebraska’s workforce needs – today about 1 in 7 working-age Nebraskans holds an NU degree – the university must not only attract more students, but ensure those students stay on the path to timely graduation.

Improving graduation rates is a strategic goal of the Board of Regents. Timely postsecondary degree completion also is a widely shared goal of Nebraska’s leaders in education, government and business because of its importance in sustaining a competitive economy and highly skilled workforce in the state.

The university already provides students and families an excellent education at a tremendous value, with tuition and fees across the campuses at least 25 percent below the peer averages. NU students, on average, graduate with similar or smaller debt loads than do students at peer institutions. Bounds said students can take full advantage of NU’s value by graduating sooner, thus minimizing their debt. For example, a fifth year of college can add about 20 percent to the cost of a bachelor’s degree.

Commit to Complete asks students to follow a basic four-step plan over the course of their college career:

  1. Visit their advisor to develop a college completion plan that fits their unique needs.

  2. Make a plan, including a course schedule for each year of school. A course load of 30 credit hours per year – either 15 credit hours each academic semester, or 12 hours per semester supplemented by summer coursework – is the recommended approach to graduating in four years. Lighter course loads may be more appropriate for the many students who are balancing work, family, military or other responsibilities; the key is that students should work with their advisors to develop a plan that works for them.

  3. Stay on track. Students should continue to meet with their advisor at least once a semester, choose an academic major by their third semester in school, and participate in internships, networking or other activities that align with their area of interest, for example.

  4. Graduate sooner, joining the 10,000 students annually who graduate from one of NU’s campuses ready to enter the workforce.

Commit to Complete supplements other strategies the university has put in place to improve graduation rates and time to degree. In 2011, the Board of Regents capped most baccalaureate degrees at 120 hours, ensuring that most students who take 30 credit hours per year can graduate in four years. Each NU campus also supports students through learning communities that provide students in the same academic programs opportunities to live and take courses together; early intervention initiatives for at-risk students; strengthened academic advising; and other efforts.


Media Contact
Melissa Lee
Director of Communication

402-472-7127 (office)
402-580-3297 (cell)
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04/11/2016 “Our Students, Our Future” initiative to raise $200 million in support of NU students
“Our Students, Our Future” initiative to raise $200 million in support of NU students

Increased access and success for current and future students is the focus of a two-year, $200 million fundraising initiative announced today by the University of Nebraska and University of Nebraska Foundation.

The “Our Students, Our Future” initiative, which will conclude at the end of 2017, will provide direct support for university students through need- and merit-based scholarships that will make their college education more affordable; support for programs that improve student outcomes, particularly among traditionally underrepresented students; improvements to facilities that will enhance the learning experience; and other student-focused priorities.

Our Students, Our Future seeks to not only advance the university’s highest priority of affordable excellence, but also position the university to attract more students in support of its goals to significantly grow enrollment and produce more graduates for Nebraska’s workforce.

“I’ve been fortunate to experience firsthand the transformative power of higher education. My goal is for the University of Nebraska to be accessible to every student who wants to change their life in the same way education changed mine,” said NU President Hank Bounds. “The university is doing great things to advance the Board of Regents’ priority of affordable excellence. Yet we know unmet need remains. With support from generous alumni and friends, Our Students, Our Future will help us become a giant in higher education, doing even more to ensure affordability and success for our students – the future leaders of Nebraska.”

Bounds noted that because of stable support from the state, the university has been able to keep tuition and fees across the campuses at least 25 percent below the peer averages. More than half of all NU undergraduates receive financial aid. Still, most NU students – including 77 percent of UNK undergraduates, 72 percent of UNO undergraduates and 62 percent of UNL undergraduates – apply for need-based financial aid, demonstrating that need remains high. To help ensure that the university remains accessible for students and families, and to be successful in growing enrollment, which this year reached a 22-year high, the university must maintain its focus on supporting students, Bounds said.

Our Students, Our Future seeks gifts that will increase both immediate, expendable funds available for student scholarships, as well as permanently endowed scholarship funds that will enable the university to support many generations of students. In addition, the initiative seeks funding for university programs focused on helping students stay in school and complete their degree, as well as support for learning facilities that meet student interests and enhance the learning experience.

“Past and current support from University of Nebraska alumni and friends has been nothing short of phenomenal, and that generosity has helped position our university to meet the needs of our state and citizens,” said Brian Hastings, president and CEO of the University of Nebraska Foundation. “Our Students, Our Future will build on that momentum through strategic, targeted investments in our students that will ensure affordable access to an excellent education, aid the university’s enrollment growth objectives, assist with student completion and success initiatives, and enhance the learning environment and student experience.”

Objectives of Our Students, Our Future include:

  • Learning communities at UNO and UNK, which allow students in the same academic programs to live and study together, improving their chances of success.

  • Campus support services for military and veteran students at UNO, which is currently ranked as the most military-friendly university in the country.

  • UNO’s Strauss Performing Arts Center, where expanded classroom and performance space is needed to meet the needs of the growing number of music majors on campus.

  • Scholarships for students enrolled in programs of emphasis at UNK, including health care, business, education, math, engineering and science, as well as the Honors Program, which attracts top student talent.

  • The Nebraska Legends scholarship program at UNL, which helps attract students within and beyond Nebraska, and scholarships for the Jeffrey S. Raikes School of Computer Science and Management, which draws top students with computer science and interdisciplinary business knowledge.

  • Renovation at UNL’s Love Library to create a learning commons area that will provide a space for student use 24 hours per day, seven days per week, and creation of a commons area on East Campus that will create collaborative community space for student and faculty interaction. Plans include renovation at the Nebraska East Union and Food Industry Complex/Filley Hall, as well as a new plaza, student housing and renovation of the C.Y. Thompson Library.

  • UNMC’s Interdisciplinary Experiential Center for Enduring Learning (iEXCEL), a “virtual reality” education center that will allow students to learn and test their skills in a life-like environment.

  • Programs at UNMC that expose high school and undergraduate students to opportunities in health care, thus creating a stronger pipeline of future health workers, as well as scholarship programs for rural, low-income and other underserved students.

  • Scholarships for graduate students at UNMC, for whom fellowships and stipends are a key tool for recruitment and retention.

“The focus of programs and initiatives on each campus may be unique, but the end goal is the same: a direct impact on our students and an enhancement of their University of Nebraska experience,” Hastings said.

Any gift made to the University of Nebraska Foundation in support of a student scholarship fund or student-oriented program before the end of 2017 will count toward the $200 million goal. To learn more about Our Students, Our Future, or to give online, visit nufoundation.org/ourstudentsourfuture.

Our Students, Our Future comes on the heels of the Campaign for Nebraska: Unlimited Possibilities, a nine-year comprehensive fundraising campaign that ended Dec. 31, 2014, after raising more than $1.8 billion for the University of Nebraska. Student support was among the highest priorities of the campaign, and donors contributed more than $273 million for scholarships, fellowships and other forms of student support. Our Students, Our Future will build on that momentum, expanding affordable access even further for students and families.

About the University of Nebraska Foundation
The University of Nebraska Foundation is an independent, nonprofit organization that has raised private gifts to support the University of Nebraska for more than 79 years. During the 2013-2014 fiscal year, donors provided the university with $258.1 million for scholarships, academic programs, medical and other research, faculty support and facilities. Our Students, Our Future is the foundation’s current initiative to secure broad support for students. For more information, visit nufoundation.org.


Media Contact
Melissa Lee
Director of Communication

402-472-7127 (office)
402-580-3297 (cell)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
04/11/2016 University of Nebraska to celebrate installation of President Hank Bounds April 15
University of Nebraska to celebrate installation of President Hank Bounds
April 15

Nebraskans are invited to help celebrate the formal installation of University of Nebraska President Hank Bounds this Friday, April 15 – almost a year to the day after Bounds became NU’s seventh president.

Friday’s events provide an opportunity for Bounds to reflect on his first year as president and lay out his goals moving forward. Bounds, who came to Nebraska after serving as commissioner of higher education in his native Mississippi, began his tenure at NU on April 13, 2015.

"I'm convinced we can do even more on behalf of the state and world. I'm excited to share with Nebraskans how I think we can do that."

“Over the past year, I’ve had the opportunity to listen to and learn from Nebraskans about their hopes and dreams for their university,” Bounds said. “My travels across the state and conversations with constituents have confirmed for me that the people of Nebraska care deeply about the university. With their support, we have been successful in advancing our goals for affordability and competitiveness. I’m convinced we can do even more on behalf of the state and world. I’m excited to share with Nebraskans how I think we can do that.”

Installation events will begin with a ceremony at 10 a.m. at Kimball Recital Hall, 1113 R St. on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln campus. The ceremony – formally known in the academic world as an “investiture” – will include a speech from Bounds; remarks from University of Southern Mississippi President Dr. Rodney Bennett, a friend and former colleague of Bounds’; and greetings from a range of NU constituents, including Gov. Pete Ricketts and representatives of the faculty, staff, administration and students of the university.

Limited seating is available at Kimball Hall. Members of the university community or public who wish to attend in person are asked to RSVP here. Overflow seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis at the Mary Riepma Ross Media Arts Center, 313 N. 13th St.

The ceremony also will be broadcast live and streamed live online via Nebraska Educational Telecommunications, KLPR radio in Kearney, KRNU radio in Lincoln and KVNO radio in Omaha. Full details on live broadcast and streaming opportunities are available here.

An open-house reception will immediately follow the ceremony at the Van Brunt Visitors Center, 313 N. 13th St. in Lincoln. All members of the university community and public are welcome.

Throughout the week and following Friday’s installation, Nebraskans are invited to share memories and photos from Bounds’ first year, well-wishes and thoughts on the ceremony by using #HankBounds16 on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

Media Contact
Melissa Lee
Director of Communication

402-472-7127 (office)
402-580-3297 (cell)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
04/11/2016 At installation, University of Nebraska President Hank Bounds lays out agenda for success
At installation, University of Nebraska President Hank Bounds lays out agenda for success

Almost a year to the day after he took office as the seventh president of the University of Nebraska, Hank Bounds marked his formal installation by outlining an ambitious agenda for making NU one of the leading institutions in the country.

Before hundreds of guests today at Kimball Recital Hall on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln campus, including family members, friends, members of the Board of Regents and university colleagues, students, community members, Gov. Pete Ricketts and other policymakers, Bounds described to Nebraskans four broad “cornerstones” for success that he said will separate the university from the rest of the higher education world.

"If we focus on our priorities, then I believe we have an opportunity to define a new era in the history of the university."

The cornerstones are informed by Bounds’ extensive travels across the state over the past year, beginning with a 1,500-mile road trip that included stops in 20 communities during his first week as president; visits to each NU campus and research and extension facility; meetings with numerous students, faculty and staff; and conversations with Nebraskans about their goals for their university.

“When I interviewed for this job, I said that the University of Nebraska had the potential to be a giant in higher education,” Bounds said during his address, part of a traditional ceremony in the academic world to celebrate a new era of leadership. “I said then – and I am even more convinced now – that we can be one of America’s great universities…

“Being a giant doesn’t mean we can be everything. Nor will becoming a giant be easy, particularly when you consider that we are operating in the most competitive higher education environment of our lifetimes. But if we focus on our priorities, then I believe we have an opportunity to define a new era in the history of the university.”

Bounds’ cornerstones – which he said engage every Nebraskan in some way – are:

1. The University of Nebraska will be the best place in the nation to be a student.

For example, Bounds said NU must:

  • Ensure affordable access for all Nebraska students, particularly those who have historically been underrepresented in higher education.
  • Provide outstanding advising, intrusively so when necessary, so that students stay on the path to graduation and earn their degree and enter the workforce sooner.
  • Maintain the “gold standard” of education, providing students with the skills they need to be successful in today’s rapidly changing job market.
  • Ensure the safety and well-being of all students, including increasing diversity and cultivating an environment free of discrimination, harassment and violence.
2. The University of Nebraska will transform lives through research and innovation.

NU has an opportunity to play a global leadership role in areas including the sustainable use of water for agriculture, early childhood education and care, cancer research and care, national security and defense, rural development, engineering and information technology, the arts and humanities and others.

To build its reputation and maximize the impact of its research on Nebraskans and people around the world, Bounds said, the university must invest in talent and facilities, and foster a culture of innovation where risk-taking is encouraged, where the path from the lab to the marketplace is clear, and where interdisciplinary and cross-campus collaboration is the norm.

3. The University of Nebraska will work hand-in-hand with partners to achieve shared goals.

Nebraskans have widely shared goals for excellent education, economic growth and quality of life. Bounds reaffirmed the university’s commitment to working alongside partners at the Capitol, in the business community, in K-12 and other higher education institutions, and in the philanthropic community to advance the state’s priorities.

4. The University of Nebraska will win with people.

Noting that none of his goals will be achievable without the university’s talented faculty and staff, Bounds said NU must work to compensate employees competitively, create an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, and provide employees with the tools they need to do their jobs successfully.

“We live in the heart of the greatest nation the world has ever known – a nation that is great in large part because early leaders recognized the value of education,” Bounds said. “Today other nations are catching up. We have to maintain our competitive advantage, and the University of Nebraska must play a part. The federal government has to invest. The state of Nebraska has to invest. We have to serve our students effectively. We have to hold hands with our partners. And the University of Nebraska must be a giant in the places that our state and nation need us to be.”

Friday’s ceremony, hosted by the NU Board of Regents, also included remarks from Board Chairman Kent Schroeder, who said the university must rise to the challenge of differentiating itself in an environment of rapidly changing demographics, economic factors, technology, increasing competition for talent, and student and parent expectations.

“Our mission to serve the state and its people has perhaps never been more relevant or important,” Schroeder said. “The University of Nebraska, like other institutions of higher learning, is increasingly called upon to lead the way in sustaining our state’s economic competitiveness, in providing an educated workforce, in ensuring excellent health care and quality of life, and in addressing the most urgent problems facing the world today.”

Rodney Bennett, a friend and former colleague of Bounds who is president of the University of Southern Mississippi, delivered a keynote address. Bennett, the first black president of a predominantly white higher education institution in Mississippi, noted Bounds’ focus on student success and said Bounds “leads with a sense of urgency.”

Additionally, the following Nebraskans provided greetings to Bounds on behalf of key constituencies of the university:

  • Pete Ricketts
  • Jeffrey Gold, M.D., chancellor of the University of Nebraska Medical Center
  • Sam Meisels, founding executive director of NU’s Buffett Early Childhood Institute
  • Evan Calhoun, student body president at the University of Nebraska at Kearney
  • Susan Sheridan, George Holmes University Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Katrina Brooks, assistant director of the Thompson Learning Community at the University of Nebraska at Omaha
  • Matt Blomstedt, Nebraska commissioner of education

Bounds became NU president on April 13, 2015. Previously he was commissioner of higher education in his native Mississippi.

Nebraskans are encouraged to share their comments the installation ceremony and the cornerstones Bounds outlined by using #HankBounds16 on social media.

Media Contact
Melissa Lee
Director of Communication

402-472-7127 (office)
402-580-3297 (cell)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
04/06/2016 Advancement CRM Newsletter

Below are past newsletters pertaining to the Advancement CRM project.

03/22/2016 Advancement CRM

Advancement CRM Objective

The University of Nebraska would like to give each friend, donor and alumni of the university the best possible experience. One aspect of providing a great experience is having all critical information about our friends, alumni and donors in one place. The university, with the foundation, is embarking on an effort to create an Advancement Constituent Relationship Management (CRM) system to create “one source of truth” about each and every individual.

Being able to capture the preferences of each individual and all interactions with those individuals and then having the ability to access that information anytime and anywhere allows the university to have the smartest conversations possible with our donors and alumni and will provide a customized, consistent experience for each friend of the university.

The Advancement CRM will be available to all colleges, campuses, alumni associations and the foundation in order to facilitate university advancement efforts.


Project Name

After a naming contest conducted across the university community, the Advancement CRM has been nicknamed “Ali,” short for Aletheia. In the Greek language, Aletheia is variously translated as unclosedness or unconcealedness. In Greek mythology, Aletheia is considered the Goddess of Truth.



Project Timeline


View the Project Timeline


Steering Committee

Brian Hastings University of Nebraska Foundation
Mike Bird Foundation Development
Shelley Zaborowski Alumni Associations
Mark Askren University of Nebraska Information Technology
Larry Hartley Foundation Information Technology
Dorothy Endacott Foundation Marketing Communications
Celeste Knapper Foundation Finance
Connie Soucie Foundation Talent, Culture & HR
Ben Storck Foundation Operations & Special Projects
Ben Kriegler Foundation Research, Reporting & Analytics

Newsletter
Issue 3 | June 27, 2016

View the Newsletter Archive

Links
University of Nebraska Central Administration
University of Nebraska Foundation
Blackbaud Solution Provider
January 2017 CRM Survey
Ali CRM Q&As


Contact
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Disclaimer
Aletheia is a constituent records management system that will be used to store and track information related to advancement of the University of Nebraska through engagement with alumni, donors and friends of the University. The system (and all data stored therein) is owned by the University of Nebraska Foundation.

02/24/2016 UNL Chancellor Finalists Campus Visits and Public Schedule
UNL Chancellor Finalists Campus Visits: Public Schedule
UNL Chancellor Finalists Campus Visits and Public Schedule

University of Nebraska President Hank Bounds welcomes your input on the finalists for chancellor of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Share your feedback below.

 

01/29/2016 The Road Ahead Starts Right Here

The Road Ahead 
Starts Right Here

Creating a better future is the perfect challenge for Nebraska’s only public research university. Each of the University of Nebraska's four campuses has unique strengths—from metropolitan to rural, land grant and research to academic medicine. These strengths create a breadth of expertise that is unmatched. Together, we are making an impact—for our state and for our world.

ONE UNIVERSITY. 
FOUR CAMPUSES. 
ONE NEBRASKA.

A unified battle against cancer: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center

The statistics are staggering. It’s estimated that 1 in 2 women and 1 in 3 men will develop cancer in their lifetime.

Yet there’s still no hope for a cure. But there is a new way in which the research and treatment of cancer will change the lives of patients and their family members. It will happen at the Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center.

Here, silos will be broken, bringing patients together with scientists focused on cancer research and the physicians treating these patients. They will work in a common space in order to reach a common goal— finding breakthroughs in cancer therapy. At the helm will be Sarah Thayer, M.D., PhD, a physician and -scientist with international notoriety who embodies clinical care and research happening side-by-side.

Together, this team of brilliant minds is determined to make great strides in cancer diagnosis, treatment and healing. Every patient will be treated individually. Every case approached differently. And every recovery one step close to winning the battle.

More on Buffett Cancer Center More on UNMC

Breakthroughs in helping people move again: Dr. Nick Stergiou

It’s morning. Your alarm clock blares its wake-up call. You sit up, reach to turn it off, swing your feet over the side and stand up. You walk to the bathroom, taking step after step. You brush your teeth, moving the toothbrush back and forth. Up and down. You bend over to rinse.

All this movement—involving muscles, brain, senses and environment—takes place in the span of minutes and continues to happen as you go about our day. Yet, the majority of us never think about how we move. But for Dr. Nick Stergiou and his visionary team at the University of Nebraska Omaha, it’s all they research—biomechanics, which is the study of human movement, and the forces that produce it.

But why?

If Dr. Stergiou and his team’s previous groundbreaking research is any indication, their work is vital to those suffering from movement-related disorders. Their lab incorporates principles from engineering, physiology and mathematics to understand the complexity of how humans integrate muscles, nerves, and the environment to accomplish movement. It’s housed in UNO’s Biomechanics Research Building—the first ever structure dedicated to the study of movement and home to the world’s first ever Center for Research in Human Movement Variability.

Their research has led to interventions for infants with cerebral palsy and to new treatment strategies for diseases like autism, multiple sclerosis and peripheral arterial disease. It’s helped those with problems moving due to an amputation, aging or stroke. It’s even helped astronauts regain natural walking patterns that are commonly disrupted after long trips in space.

What the team has accomplished has greatly influenced techniques in robotic surgery and rehabilitation. And, it’s given hope to millions who suffer while moving.

More on Biomechanics Research More on UNO

Cultivating a thriving startup culture: UNL’s Raikes School

Welcome to Silicon Prairie, a growing, thriving tech community that’s teeming with savvy startups and entrepreneurs—located right here in Nebraska.

At its center is Hudl, a sports video software company that’s now on Fast Company’s list of 50 most-innovative companies of 2016. It’s been said that Hudl is changing the game for coaches and players. It’s certainly changing the landscape for other progressive startups that are inspired by its achievements.

Other cities have tried to lure Hudl away—the company had its pick of either coast, yet chose to stay right here. The reason is simple: Nebraska’s expansive support system has helped it succeed. Couple that with a reasonable cost of operation, a burgeoning downtown, a family-friendly environment and the University’s backing—and it’s easy to see why Hudl is not packing its bags anytime soon.

Hudl’s three founders met at the University of Nebraska—Lincoln’s Raikes School of Computer Science and Management, where the idea for the company took shape. They were able to easily transition from college students to successful business owners. Not to mention they had a strong alumni system—including some of their initial investors—to lean on.

Another milestone for Hudl—and for Nebraska—is the company’s planned headquarters, which will be a seven-story, 110‐foot‐tall building. It will be the second largest building downtown and a new home to more than 300 employees from across Nebraska and across the country. Thanks to companies like Hudl, the best and brightest are happy to call Nebraska their home.

More on Hudl More on UNL

In search of alien life-form: Dr. Adam Jensen

Did you ever look up at a brilliant night sky and wonder… are we alone?

That is one of the many questions that NASA would like to answer. To do so, it’s established Nexus for Exoplanet System Science, an unique collaboration between several groups of experts spanning a variety of specific fields. Together, they’re tasked with searching for life beyond our solar system.

One of the groups on this mission is headed by Dr. Adam Jensen, a physics professor at the University of Nebraska at Kearney.

Dr. Jensen’s work on exoplanetary atmospheres has earned him a spot leading a diverse team that will explore the existence and evolution of exospheres. The group brings together earth scientists, planetary scientists, heliophysicists and astrophysicists in the hopes that interdisciplinary partnerships will provide a more complete picture of exoplanets. Put simply, an exoplanet is a planet beyond our solar system that orbits around a star.

The ultimate goal of the NASA team is to observe smaller exoplanets—ones that are earth‐sized—assess their atmospheres and determine if they are habitable. Then we might finally know if, in fact, we do have extraterrestrial neighbors—and where we can find them.

More on Dr. Jensen’s work More on UNK

Harnessing the Power of the Sun: Jinsong Huang

Energy. It's on everyone's mind as energy costs continue to climb. Many are concerned world energy demands will outpace production. The search is on for affordable, renewable power sources—and that search is transforming the technologies that power our nation. Yet, solar power remains just beyond reach as a widely-used energy source.

A University of Nebraska-Lincoln engineer, Jinsong Huang, is making big strides in his effort to harness the sun’s power. Current solar cells are too expensive and not efficient; his goal is to cut their cost in half—so they can compete with fossil fuel energy. And, he's tackling that goal with several million dollars in federal grants…and groundbreaking approaches to creating new material for solar cells.

Huang believes that renewable energy is the number one issue for the future. And although solar energy has a long way to go, he plans on being part of making renewable energy a major part of the solution. By lowering solar energy’s cost and increasing its efficiency, Huang—and UNL—can help meet the world’s growing energy demand.

More on Dr. Huang More on UNL

Empowering the Homeless: Kurt Borchard

Homelessness is a problem in many cities. In urban areas with high costs of living and high unemployment rates, the problem grows. Living on the street is unsafe, yet there isn’t enough room in homeless shelters to accommodate the number of people who are homeless. Now, a fascinating way of addressing the issue has surfaced—and Kurt Borchard, a professor of sociology at the University of Nebraska at Kearney, is taking a closer look.

Borchard is in the middle of a yearlong sabbatical to interview individuals in two city-sanctioned homeless encampments in Portland, Oregon—a city that struggles with homelessness. On any given night, over 1,900 people sleep on the streets. A loophole in that city’s laws has allowed the homeless population to form encampments, where camp residents have banded together to create a legal and political foundation. They can draw up contracts and negotiate with the city, giving homeless people basic rights and a safer place to live.

“It’s an innovative way to address the ongoing problem of homelessness,” Borchard says. “This problem is not going away.” His hope? To better inform people about the issue of homelessness. Everyone deserves to be treated with respect, and Borchard’s work shows how one group of homeless men and women have found a way to live with a greater sense of dignity.

More on Dr. Borchard More on UNK

Engaging Girls in the World of IT: Code Crush

IT is one of the fastest-growing job sectors in the US. However, many of these jobs may go unfilled—because there aren’t enough college graduates with computing-related degrees. And, very few women are pursuing career opportunities in IT. In 2015, only 18% of all computing and information science degrees were earned by women.

This is where “Code Crush,” an immersion experience for middle- and high-school girls at UNO's College of Information Science and Technology, comes in. The four-day program introduces girls from across Nebraska to information technology in a friendly and engaging environment—at no cost. The girls learn how no matter what their career aspirations are—there’s a place for them in IT. They program robots, make digital music, learn about innovative thinking, create mobile applications, and meet role models in IT.

UNO's CodeCrush—just one way that NU is working to diversify the IT landscape—and help fill the IT workforce deficit.

More on Code Crush More on UNO

Training The Nation For Ebola And Other Emerging Threats: UNMC

in 2014, the Ebola outbreak turned into an epidemic and spread like wildfire throughout Africa, reaching into Europe and across the sea to the US. Anyone willing to treat Ebola victims risked becoming one. But a few were brave enough to step up. Among those were healthcare professionals from UNMC’s biocontainment unit, armed with 10 years of training and preparation.

These individuals risked their own lives in order to save Ebola patients—because they knew how much they were needed. And, as a result, UNMC and its clinical partner, Nebraska Medicine, were recognized as a national asset and referred to as the “gold standard” for treatment and development of safety protocols in handling Ebola.

In the months since, medical centers and hospitals from all over the world have come to the UNMC experts to be trained for the next highly infectious disease outbreak. And, in July of 2015, UNMC was awarded a $12 million grant by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to establish and co-lead the nation’s National Ebola Training and Education Center.

When given the opportunity to make a difference, UNMC always takes it. The situations may change and the infectious diseases may vary—but as leaders in the field, they continue to tackle challenges with boldness and heart.

More on Ebola Training More on UNMC
12/08/2015 University of Nebraska Building Renewal Plan: a Partnership for Quality Education
University of Nebraska Building Renewal Plan: a Partnership for Quality Education

The University of Nebraska and the state have had a long and successful history of partnership in addressing deferred maintenance needs—needs that impact the quality and functionality of NU buildings. The University is seeking to continue this partnership under a 12-year capital plan, announced in December of 2015 by President Hank Bounds.

“To attract the best students and faculty who can contribute to Nebraska’s economic needs, it is vital to provide updated, functional facilities suited to 21st-century learning and research.”
— Hank Bounds, President
University of Nebraska

The proposal was endorsed unanimously by the Board of Regents at its December 2015 meeting, and will be brought to the Legislature and Governor for consideration in the 2016 session. It extends an NU-state partnership that began almost two decades ago to address deferred maintenance needs. The mutual investments made by the university and state during that time have allowed the university to provide students and faculty with quality classrooms, labs and offices; ensure an outstanding educational experience; and remain competitive for top talent.

University facilities, valued at $4 billion, represent more than 70 percent of the state’s net total building assets. That means the state has a stake in continuing to partner with the university in making investments that advance shared goals and protect shared state assets.

“We are operating in the most competitive higher education marketplace of our lifetimes,” says Bounds. “The University of Nebraska has ambitious goals for attracting the best students and faculty who can contribute to Nebraska’s workforce and economic needs. If we are to be successful, it’s vital that we provide updated, functional facilities that are suited to 21st-century learning and research."

Under the 2016 proposal, the university and state would each increase their annual investments by $11 million to finance a $400 million bond. The bond funds would be available for renovation and renewal projects on the four campuses.

Video
This video overviews our past partnership with the state, our data-driven capital plan, examples of the buildings we will address on each campus, and how the capital plan will benefit students and faculty.
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Detailed information about our strategic approach to deferred maintenance and the renovation and renewal projects on the four NU campuses.

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Melissa Lee
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10/22/2015 UNL Chancellor Search Media Coverage
UNL Chancellor Search Media Coverage
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10/22/2015 About the University of Nebraska-Lincoln
About the University of Nebraska-Lincoln
About the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The University of Nebraska–Lincoln, chartered in 1869, is an educational institution of international stature. UNL is listed by the Carnegie Foundation within the “Research Universities (very high research activity)” category. UNL is a land-grant university and a member of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU). The university is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. UNL celebrated the 145th anniversary of its founding on Feb. 15, 2014. See below for detailed information and additional links about UNL. 

10/22/2015 Latest Search News from the University
Latest Search News from the University
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10/22/2015 Search Information
Search Information
Search Information
Process and Timeline

The search for the next UNL chancellor is expected to last approximately 6-9 months, concluding in Spring 2016. The document below describes the general steps in the search process and the anticipated timeline, subject to change.

Search Firm Contact Information

David Bellshaw, Lindsay Gold, and Courtney Wilk
Isaacson, Miller

649 Mission Street, 5th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94105
Phone: 415-655-4932
Fax: 415-655-4905

NU News Release about the Search Firm

University of Nebraska EEO Statement

The University of Nebraska is an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity employer, committed to creating a diverse and inclusive work and learning environment free from discrimination and harassment where everyone feels valued and respected. UNL does not discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity, color, national origin, sex (including pregnancy), religion, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, veteran status, marital status, and/or political affiliation in its programs, activities and employment. UNL complies with all local, state and federal laws prohibiting discrimination, including Title IX, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex.

Public Nature of Search

Applicants are advised that job application materials, such as employment applications, resumes, references letters and/or transcripts, submitted by candidates who become finalists for the position will become public records which must be disclosed upon request. According to Nebraska law, a finalist means any applicant (i) who reaches the final pool of applicants, numbering four or more, from which the successful applicant is to be selected, (ii) who is an original applicant when the final pool of applicants numbers less than four, or (iii) who is an original applicant and there are four or fewer original applicants.

University of Nebraska President Hank Bounds has publicly identified four finalists for the UNL Chancellor. The appointment of the next chancellor will be made by the president, subject to approval by the Board of Regents, following university visits that will provide opportunities for faculty, students, key constituents and members of the public to meet the finalists and offer feedback.

Search Advisory Committee

University of Nebraska President Hank Bounds has named an advisory committee to assist him in the search for the next chancellor of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The 25-member search advisory committee includes representatives of the faculty, staff, administration, student body, private sector and agricultural community--all key constituencies with whom the UNL chancellor regularly interacts.

Search Advisory Committee

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10/22/2015 University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chancellor Search
New UNL Chancellor Named

Following a national search, President Hank Bounds, in consultation with a search advisory committee and professional search firm Isaacson, Miller, has named Ronnie D. Green, Ph.D., the 20th chancellor of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Green has been at UNL since 2010 and currently serves as vice president and Harlan Vice Chancellor for the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources and interim senior vice chancellor for academic affairs. If his appointment is confirmed by the Board of Regents, Green will succeed Chancellor Harvey Perlman, who has provided more than a decade and a half of leadership at UNL.

About the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chancellor Search

The UNL chancellor is the chief executive officer of the largest of the four University of Nebraska campuses, a member of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities and the Big Ten Conference. The incumbent, Harvey Perlman, is stepping down in 2016 after a decade and a half of leadership during which the campus experienced significant gains in enrollment and research activity, investments in infrastructure and facilities, expansion of international partnerships, and formation of a 250-acre public/private research and development park.

UNL is recognized as the primary research and doctoral degree granting institution in Nebraska for fields outside the health professions. It is classified as RU/VH by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, with total research expenditures exceeding $275 million. Its annual operating budget is approximately $1.2 million. Through its three primary missions of teaching, research and service, UNL is an intellectual center for Nebraska. Its faculty and graduates are major contributors to the economic and cultural development of the state, and the campus attracts a high percentage of academically-talented students. This fall’s freshman class has an average ACT score of 25.2 and includes seven students who earned perfect scores on either the ACT or SAT, 46 National Merit Scholars, and nine National Merit Hispanic Scholars.

"Through its three primary missions of teaching, research and service, UNL is a primary intellectual center for the state, providing leadership in quality education and the generation of new knowledge."

UNL serves more than 25,000 undergraduate, graduate and professional students through nine colleges: agricultural sciences and natural resources, architecture, arts and sciences, business administration, education and human sciences, engineering, fine and performing arts, journalism and mass communications, and law. The Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources administers a two-year college of technical agriculture and oversees statewide outreach and extension services. Husker Athletics offers a competitive Division I program with 24 varsity sports, and currently enjoys the nation’s leading consecutive sellout streak in football and volleyball regular-season matches.

UNL affiliates include the Lied Center for Performing Arts, the International Quilt Study Center and Museum, the Mary Riepma Ross Media Arts Center, the Sheldon Museum of Art, the University of Nebraska State Museum, the University of Nebraska Press, and Nebraska Educational Telecommunications. The Nebraska Alumni Association works to strengthen the tie between the university and its graduates and the University of Nebraska Foundation partners with the campus to secure private philanthropy.

"The final selection of the chancellor will be made by the president, subject to approval by the University of Nebraska Board of Regents."

The University of Nebraska has retained Isaacson, Miller to assist in this national search. Screening of complete applications will continue until the completion of the search process. For more details, please see the Isaacson, Miller website for the search: www.imsearch.com/5520

President Bounds has publicly identified four finalists for the UNL chancellor position. They will visit Nebraska and participate in open forums so university stakeholders can meet the candidates and offer feedback. The final selection of the chancellor will be made by the president, subject to approval by the Board of Regents.

Search Information
Process and Timeline

The search for the next UNL chancellor is expected to last approximately 6-9 months, concluding in Spring 2016. The document below describes the general steps in the search process and the anticipated timeline, subject to change.

Position Information

Candidates or members of the general public interested in learning more about the position requirements can find that information in the two documents below.

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About the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The University of Nebraska–Lincoln is one of the nation’s leading teaching institutions, and a research leader with a wide array of grant-funded projects aimed at broadening knowledge in the sciences and humanities.

About the City of Lincoln

Lincoln has a population of just over 250,000, the perfect size for a college town. It has consistently been ranked as one of the best places to live and work in the U.S. For example, in 2012, a Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index ranked Lincoln as the #1 U.S. City in Quality of Life. In 2014, Forbes ranked Lincoln as 6th Best Place for Business and Careers, and in 2015, livability.com ranked Lincoln has a top 10 in "best downtown”.

UNL Chancellor Search Media Coverage
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Media Contact
Melissa Lee
Director of Communications
402-472-7127
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08/28/2015 UNL Chancellor Search
University of Nebraska
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